General Contractor, Construction, Kitchen Remodeling, Bathroom Remodeling, Carpentry, Electrical, Plumbing, Painting, Tiling. San Francisco General Contractor, Bay Area General Contractor.

Kitchen Electrical Upgrades


Required Electrical Outlets.  For kitchen remodels where all cabinets (lower and upper) are removed, the electrical outlets within the kitchen shall be rearranged to meet the spacing required under the National Electric Code (NEC),

Many kitchens need to have their electrical systems upgraded when remodeled in order to comply with the National Electric Code and mandatory city regulations. The National Electric Code is updated regularly and major changes were instituted in 1997. If your kitchen has not been remodeled since 1997, you will have to upgrade your kitchen’s electrical system. Especially, since the early 1990s, appliances have shorter cords, so they are not as likely to be run across cooktops or sinks or to hang down in the reach of children. As a result, more kitchen-counter receptacles are now needed. A minimum of two 20-ampere circuits is required for the countertops because of the likelihood of using appliances with large loads. Also, the new regulations include GFCI protection. 


When a Permit is Not Needed


Most major projects will require permits of some kind (building permits and/or planning permits). This is necessary to ensure that all buildings meet minimum standards which protect its occupants and neighbors in everyday living and in the case of emerge ncies or natural disasters.


Some minor projects are allowed without obtaining building permits. However, depending upon the project, other permits (planning permits, special activities permits, etc.) may be required. In either case, the construction of such projects should be in c onformance with all applicable codes.



Some of the projects which do not require a building permit are:


1.Retaining walls or planter boxes which are no more than 4' in height (measured from the bottom of the footing to the top of the wall) and do not support another structure, fence, or take on additional loads. 

2.Wood or chain link fences not greater than 6' high (or not greater than 3' high if masonry). 

3.Decks and platforms less than thirty inches above grade and not within six feet of any other building or structure which requires (or required) a building permit for its construction. 

4.Exterior stairs that are no greater than 30" above grade, and are not a part of an exiting system. NOTE: Some exceptions may apply. See a Permit Technician at the Permit Center. 

5.Prefabricated pools accessory to a single family dwelling and have a maximum capacity of 5,000 gallons. 

6.Single story detached buildings which do not exceed 12 feet in height used as tool or storage sheds, playhouses, etc., as long as the projected roof area does not exceed 120 square feet and does not have plumbing or electricity. 


Minor improvements typically not needing a permit:


*Interior or exterior painting, 

*Installing draperies or blinds, 

*Installing carpeting or resilient floor covering, 

*Building store fixtures (display cases), 

*Building uncovered concrete patios, or 

*Changing fixtures and utility outlets, such as lighting and light switches. 

These examples are only some of the exempted projects which are listed in various code books. Not all exempted projects have been included. Contact the Permit Center for additional information. 



KITCHEN REMODEL CHECK LIST 


1. Floor Plan.  Provide a floor plan of the kitchen layout and any additional framing plans or details to accurately describe the work.  Drawings which show separately the “before and after” arrangement of the kitchen are acceptable and sometimes necessary to avoid trying to include too much on one floor plan.  Include the following minimum information on the plans: 

a. Walls.  Show the location of all walls.  Delineate clearly between existing, new, and removed walls using a clear and distinguishable wall symbol for each wall type.  Use double lines to represent walls.  Avoid the use of single lines to represent a wall.  Non-filled double lines typically represent existing walls.  Solid filled or hatched double lines typically represent new walls.  Dashed or dotted double lines typically denote removed walls.  If a wall is to be removed, see Item #6 below for required structural information. 

b. Doors and Windows.  Show all existing, new, removed, and/or relocated doors and windows.  For new and relocated windows, specify the U value of the windows in accordance with the State Title 24 energy provisions.  If the scope of work does not include the installation of new or the relocation of existing doors or windows, state this on the plans.  For new doors and windows, see Item #6 below for required structural information.  Where light and ventilation is effected, provide door and window sizes to the exterior. 

c. Cabinets and Appliances.  The floor plan must show the proposed layout and location of cabinets and all major appliances.  Delineate between new, reinstalled, and relocated appliances. 

d. Light Fixtures and Switches.  Show the location of existing, new, removed, and/or relocated light fixtures and light switches.  Use a fixture legend to delineate between fixture types.  If no lighting changes are to be made, specify on the plans that no lighting changes are included in the scope of the work.  See Item #5 below for Title 24 energy requirements associated with lighting modifications in the kitchen. 

e. Ceiling Changes.  Where the ceiling system is to be modified or removed, include a ceiling framing plan with cross sections sufficiently detailed to accurately describe/show what work is to be done.  This may require complete cross sections through the building in two orthogonal directions to show the necessary level of architectural and structural details. 

2. Smoke Detectors.  Smoke detectors shall be installed in existing bedrooms, in hallways, and within each story per the Uniform Building Code (UBC). 

3. Required Electrical Outlets.   For kitchen remodels where all cabinets (lower and upper) are removed, the electrical outlets within the kitchen shall be rearranged to meet the spacing required under the National Electric Code (NEC), as follows: 

a. Wall counter space.  A receptacle outlet shall be installed at each wall counter space 12 inches or wider.  Receptacle 

outlets shall be installed so that no point along the wall line is more than 24 inches or greater. 

b. Island and/or Peninsular counter spaces.  At least one receptacle outlet shall be installed at each island or peninsular counter space with a long dimension of 24 in. or greater and a short dimension of 12 in. or greater. A peninsular countertop is measured from the connecting edge. 

c. Separate spaces.  Counter spaces separated by range tops, refrigerators, or sinks shall be considered as separate countertop spaces in applying the requirements of a) and b) above. 

d. Receptacle outlet location.  Receptacle outlets shall be installed above, but not more than 18 in. above, the countertop.  Receptacle outlets shall not be installed in a face-up position in the work surfaces or countertops. 

Receptacle outlets rendered not readily accessible due to appliances fastened in place or appliances occupying dedicated space shall not be considered as these required outlets.  For all counter spaces (wall, peninsular and 

island), receptacle outlets are permitted to be mounted not more than 12 in. below the countertop,  provided the countertops do not extend more than 6 in. beyond its support base. 

e. General wall outlet spacing.  Receptacle outlets shall be installed so that no point along the floor line in any wall space is more than 6 ft., measured horizontally, from an outlet in that space, including any wall space 2 ft. or more in width and the wall space occupied by fixed panels in exterior walls, but excluding sliding panels in exterior walls. 

The wall space afforded by fixed room dividers, such as freestanding bar-type counters or railings, shall be included in the 6-ft measurement.  Wall space shall be considered a wall unbroken along the floor line by doorways, 

fireplaces, and similar openings.  Each wall space 2 ft. or more wide shall be treated individually and separately form other wall spaces within the room.  Floor mounted receptacles located within 18 in. of the wall may be counted 

as part of the required number of outlets.  Outlets satisfying general outlet spacing shall be located within 5 ½  feet vertically above the floor. 

4. GFCI Protection.  Ground-Fault Circuit Interrupters are required for receptacles installed to serve counter-top surfaces. 

5. Where fuel gas lines are newly installed, relocated, or repaired a pressure test is required.  Gas lines shall be sized in accordance with the Uniform Plumbing Code provisions by a qualified installer.  Applicant shall 

provide gas line sizing calculations.  The calculations must contain a piping/appliance single-line drawing of the proposed piping system for which the calculations were based.  The diagram shall specify all existing and new gas fired appliances and their rated input.  The diagram shall also show all pipe segment lengths and diameters between the service meter connection and pipe junctions and appliance terminations. 

6. California Title 24 Energy.  When light fixtures are replaced or new light fixtures added in the kitchen, lamps with an efficacy (efficiency) of not less than 40 lumens per watt shall be provided.  Fluorescent lights will meet this 40 lumens per watt requirement.  General lighting using these lamps shall provide sufficient light level for basic kitchen tasks and provide a 

uniform pattern of illumination.  A single luminaries, or set of luminaries, controlled by a single light switch that is the only lighting in the kitchen will be considered general lighting. General lighting shall be controlled by a switch on a readily accessible lighting control panel at an entrance to the kitchen.  Additional luminaries that are switched separately and used 

only for decorative effects need not meet this requirement.  Luminaries installed to meet the 40 lumens per watt requirements shall not contain medium base incandescent lamp sockets, and shall be on separate switches from any incandescent lighting. 

7. Structural Drawings and Details.  If a wall is to be removed, or if a new wall opening for either a door or a window, at either exterior or interior walls, is to be made, provide a floor or roof/ceiling-framing plan above to clearly indicate bearing or non-bearing conditions.  The framing plan must include complete spans of the members resting directly on the top plates of 

the wall being removed and complete span layout of members that are supported by use of kickers resting on top of the wall. Where headers are installed, indicate material specifications for header and posts.  Typical designations for headers and posts are 4x12 D.F. No. 1 or better and  4x4 D.F. #1 or better, respectively. The appropriateness of these sizes, species and stress grades will depend upon the loads that the beams or headers must carry.  This is why the framing plan is necessary.  Footings must be provided directly under posts which support header or beam loads.  Details of the footings must be included in the drawings.  The City may require an engineer or architect to be hired by the owner to evaluate beams, headers, posts, and/or footings, as necessary. 


Wiring and equipment installed in accordance with the National Electrical Code will be protected against arcing faults to a certain degree by a circuit breaker, fuse, or ground-fault circuit-interrupter. Circuit breakers and fuses are reasonably effective in preventing fire causes for conditions under which they are designed to operate. That is, when a bolted short circuit or ground fault occurs the circuit’s overcurrent protection device opens, fires are frequently prevented

The 1999 NEC Rule: 210-12. Arc-Fault Circuit-Interrupter Protection

(a) Definition. An arc-fault circuit interrupter is a device intended to provide protection from the effects of arc faults by recognizing characteristics unique to arcing and by functioning to de-energize the circuit when an arc fault is detected.

(b) Dwelling Unit Bedrooms. All branch circuits that supply 125-volt, single-phase, 15- and 20-ampere receptacle outlets installed in dwelling unit bedrooms shall be protected by an arc-fault circuit interrupter(s). This requirement shall become effective January 1, 2002.



KITCHEN REMODEL 


Please Note: Cabinet layout plans supplied by Home Improvement Stores are not acceptable for plan check purposes and are not a substitute for the drawings. Requirements for Permit Submittal: Before approval and issuance of a building permit for kitchen remodel applicant shall submit four (4) sets of plans (minimum size 11”x17”), which are drawn to scale (or at the very minimum fully dimensioned), readable, legible, and include the following information:


1. Cover Sheet including the following: (a) project address; (b) owner’s name, address, phone number; (c) name, address and phone number of the person preparing the plans, (d) scope of work statement; (e) sheet index indicating each sheet title and number, (f) legend for symbols, abbreviations and notations used in the drawings.


2. Site Plan for any new exterior alterations (i.e., enlargement/addition of exterior windows, doors, skylights, fan/duct/vent terminations, etc.). On Site Plan please specify lot dimensions and clearly indicate the distances from the building to property lines.


3. Existing Floor Plan for a floor/story where the kitchen is located. Specify the existing use of all rooms and areas. Show location of existing kitchen. (Note: existing floor plan does not have to be to scale and is required for reference purposes only).


4. Proposed Kitchen Floor Plan showing type and location of proposed interior cabinetry, countertops, appliances, plumbing & gas fixtures, etc. Include construction legend identifying and describing new work and clearly showing the difference between the existing and proposed conditions. Exterior windows/doors added and/or replaced as part of the remodeling project shall be clearly identified on the plans and shall have a fenestration U-Factor of 0.67 or less.


5. Construction details for any new/reframed interior walls, interior/exterior openings, etc.


6. Electrical Plan (may be combined with the floor plan) showing compliance with the following requirements:


A. Specify receptacle outlets at each kitchen counter space wider than 12”, located so that no point along the counter wall is more than 24” from a receptacle per CEC Art.210-52;


B. Specify at least one receptacle outlet at each island or peninsular counter space with a long dimension of 24” or greater and a short dimension of 12” or greater per CEC Art.210Kitchen Electrical Upgrades


Required Electrical Outlets.  For kitchen remodels where all cabinets (lower and upper) are removed, the electrical outlets within the kitchen shall be rearranged to meet the spacing required under the National Electric Code (NEC),

Many kitchens need to have their electrical systems upgraded when remodeled in order to comply with the National Electric Code and mandatory city regulations. The National Electric Code is updated regularly and major changes were instituted in 1997. If your kitchen has not been remodeled since 1997, you will have to upgrade your kitchen’s electrical system. Especially, since the early 1990s, appliances have shorter cords, so they are not as likely to be run across cooktops or sinks or to hang down in the reach of children. As a result, more kitchen-counter receptacles are now needed. A minimum of two 20-ampere circuits is required for the countertops because of the likelihood of using appliances with large loads. Also, the new regulations include GFCI protection. 



When a Permit is Not Needed


Most major projects will require permits of some kind (building permits and/or planning permits). This is necessary to ensure that all buildings meet minimum standards which protect its occupants and neighbors in everyday living and in the case of emerge ncies or natural disasters.


Some minor projects are allowed without obtaining building permits. However, depending upon the project, other permits (planning permits, special activities permits, etc.) may be required. In either case, the construction of such projects should be in c onformance with all applicable codes.



Some of the projects which do not require a building permit are:


1.Retaining walls or planter boxes which are no more than 4' in height (measured from the bottom of the footing to the top of the wall) and do not support another structure, fence, or take on additional loads. 

2.Wood or chain link fences not greater than 6' high (or not greater than 3' high if masonry). 

3.Decks and platforms less than thirty inches above grade and not within six feet of any other building or structure which requires (or required) a building permit for its construction. 

4.Exterior stairs that are no greater than 30" above grade, and are not a part of an exiting system. NOTE: Some exceptions may apply. See a Permit Technician at the Permit Center. 

5.Prefabricated pools accessory to a single family dwelling and have a maximum capacity of 5,000 gallons. 

6.Single story detached buildings which do not exceed 12 feet in height used as tool or storage sheds, playhouses, etc., as long as the projected roof area does not exceed 120 square feet and does not have plumbing or electricity. 


Minor improvements typically not needing a permit:


*Interior or exterior painting, 

*Installing draperies or blinds, 

*Installing carpeting or resilient floor covering, 

*Building store fixtures (display cases), 

*Building uncovered concrete patios, or 

*Changing fixtures and utility outlets, such as lighting and light switches. 

These examples are only some of the exempted projects which are listed in various code books. Not all exempted projects have been included. Contact the Permit Center for additional information. 


KITCHEN REMODEL CHECK LIST 


1. Floor Plan.  Provide a floor plan of the kitchen layout and any additional framing plans or details to accurately describe the work.  Drawings which show separately the “before and after” arrangement of the kitchen are acceptable and sometimes necessary to avoid trying to include too much on one floor plan.  Include the following minimum information on the plans: 

a. Walls.  Show the location of all walls.  Delineate clearly between existing, new, and removed walls using a clear and distinguishable wall symbol for each wall type.  Use double lines to represent walls.  Avoid the use of single lines to represent a wall.  Non-filled double lines typically represent existing walls.  Solid filled or hatched double lines typically represent new walls.  Dashed or dotted double lines typically denote removed walls.  If a wall is to be removed, see Item #6 below for required structural information. 

b. Doors and Windows.  Show all existing, new, removed, and/or relocated doors and windows.  For new and relocated windows, specify the U value of the windows in accordance with the State Title 24 energy provisions.  If the scope of work does not include the installation of new or the relocation of existing doors or windows, state this on the plans.  For new doors and windows, see Item #6 below for required structural information.  Where light and ventilation is effected, provide door and window sizes to the exterior. 

c. Cabinets and Appliances.  The floor plan must show the proposed layout and location of cabinets and all major appliances.  Delineate between new, reinstalled, and relocated appliances. 

d. Light Fixtures and Switches.  Show the location of existing, new, removed, and/or relocated light fixtures and light switches.  Use a fixture legend to delineate between fixture types.  If no lighting changes are to be made, specify on the plans that no lighting changes are included in the scope of the work.  See Item #5 below for Title 24 energy requirements associated with lighting modifications in the kitchen. 

e. Ceiling Changes.  Where the ceiling system is to be modified or removed, include a ceiling framing plan with cross sections sufficiently detailed to accurately describe/show what work is to be done.  This may require complete cross sections through the building in two orthogonal directions to show the necessary level of architectural and structural details. 

2. Smoke Detectors.  Smoke detectors shall be installed in existing bedrooms, in hallways, and within each story per the Uniform Building Code (UBC). 

3. Required Electrical Outlets.   For kitchen remodels where all cabinets (lower and upper) are removed, the electrical outlets within the kitchen shall be rearranged to meet the spacing required under the National Electric Code (NEC), as follows: 

a. Wall counter space.  A receptacle outlet shall be installed at each wall counter space 12 inches or wider.  Receptacle 

outlets shall be installed so that no point along the wall line is more than 24 inches or greater. 

b. Island and/or Peninsular counter spaces.  At least one receptacle outlet shall be installed at each island or peninsular counter space with a long dimension of 24 in. or greater and a short dimension of 12 in. or greater. A peninsular countertop is measured from the connecting edge. 

c. Separate spaces.  Counter spaces separated by range tops, refrigerators, or sinks shall be considered as separate countertop spaces in applying the requirements of a) and b) above. 

d. Receptacle outlet location.  Receptacle outlets shall be installed above, but not more than 18 in. above, the countertop.  Receptacle outlets shall not be installed in a face-up position in the work surfaces or countertops. 

Receptacle outlets rendered not readily accessible due to appliances fastened in place or appliances occupying dedicated space shall not be considered as these required outlets.  For all counter spaces (wall, peninsular and 

island), receptacle outlets are permitted to be mounted not more than 12 in. below the countertop,  provided the countertops do not extend more than 6 in. beyond its support base. 

e. General wall outlet spacing.  Receptacle outlets shall be installed so that no point along the floor line in any wall space is more than 6 ft., measured horizontally, from an outlet in that space, including any wall space 2 ft. or more in width and the wall space occupied by fixed panels in exterior walls, but excluding sliding panels in exterior walls. 

The wall space afforded by fixed room dividers, such as freestanding bar-type counters or railings, shall be included in the 6-ft measurement.  Wall space shall be considered a wall unbroken along the floor line by doorways, 

fireplaces, and similar openings.  Each wall space 2 ft. or more wide shall be treated individually and separately form other wall spaces within the room.  Floor mounted receptacles located within 18 in. of the wall may be counted 

as part of the required number of outlets.  Outlets satisfying general outlet spacing shall be located within 5 ½  feet vertically above the floor. 

4. GFCI Protection.  Ground-Fault Circuit Interrupters are required for receptacles installed to serve counter-top surfaces. 

5. Where fuel gas lines are newly installed, relocated, or repaired a pressure test is required.  Gas lines shall be sized in accordance with the Uniform Plumbing Code provisions by a qualified installer.  Applicant shall 

provide gas line sizing calculations.  The calculations must contain a piping/appliance single-line drawing of the proposed piping system for which the calculations were based.  The diagram shall specify all existing and new gas fired appliances and their rated input.  The diagram shall also show all pipe segment lengths and diameters between the service meter connection and pipe junctions and appliance terminations. 

6. California Title 24 Energy.  When light fixtures are replaced or new light fixtures added in the kitchen, lamps with an efficacy (efficiency) of not less than 40 lumens per watt shall be provided.  Fluorescent lights will meet this 40 lumens per watt requirement.  General lighting using these lamps shall provide sufficient light level for basic kitchen tasks and provide a 

uniform pattern of illumination.  A single luminaries, or set of luminaries, controlled by a single light switch that is the only lighting in the kitchen will be considered general lighting. General lighting shall be controlled by a switch on a readily accessible lighting control panel at an entrance to the kitchen.  Additional luminaries that are switched separately and used 

only for decorative effects need not meet this requirement.  Luminaries installed to meet the 40 lumens per watt requirements shall not contain medium base incandescent lamp sockets, and shall be on separate switches from any incandescent lighting. 

7. Structural Drawings and Details.  If a wall is to be removed, or if a new wall opening for either a door or a window, at either exterior or interior walls, is to be made, provide a floor or roof/ceiling-framing plan above to clearly indicate bearing or non-bearing conditions.  The framing plan must include complete spans of the members resting directly on the top plates of 

the wall being removed and complete span layout of members that are supported by use of kickers resting on top of the wall. Where headers are installed, indicate material specifications for header and posts.  Typical designations for headers and posts are 4x12 D.F. No. 1 or better and  4x4 D.F. #1 or better, respectively. The appropriateness of these sizes, species and stress grades will depend upon the loads that the beams or headers must carry.  This is why the framing plan is necessary.  Footings must be provided directly under posts which support header or beam loads.  Details of the footings must be included in the drawings.  The City may require an engineer or architect to be hired by the owner to evaluate beams, headers, posts, and/or footings, as necessary. 



Wiring and equipment installed in accordance with the National Electrical Code will be protected against arcing faults to a certain degree by a circuit breaker, fuse, or ground-fault circuit-interrupter. Circuit breakers and fuses are reasonably effective in preventing fire causes for conditions under which they are designed to operate. That is, when a bolted short circuit or ground fault occurs the circuit’s overcurrent protection device opens, fires are frequently prevented

The 1999 NEC Rule: 210-12. Arc-Fault Circuit-Interrupter Protection

(a) Definition. An arc-fault circuit interrupter is a device intended to provide protection from the effects of arc faults by recognizing characteristics unique to arcing and by functioning to de-energize the circuit when an arc fault is detected.

(b) Dwelling Unit Bedrooms. All branch circuits that supply 125-volt, single-phase, 15- and 20-ampere receptacle outlets installed in dwelling unit bedrooms shall be protected by an arc-fault circuit interrupter(s). This requirement shall become effective January 1, 2002



KITCHEN REMODEL 


Please Note: Cabinet layout plans supplied by Home Improvement Stores are not acceptable for plan check purposes and are not a substitute for the drawings. Requirements for Permit Submittal: Before approval and issuance of a building permit for kitchen remodel applicant shall submit four (4) sets of plans (minimum size 11”x17”), which are drawn to scale (or at the very minimum fully dimensioned), readable, legible, and include the following information:


1. Cover Sheet including the following: (a) project address; (b) owner’s name, address, phone number; (c) name, address and phone number of the person preparing the plans, (d) scope of work statement; (e) sheet index indicating each sheet title and number, (f) legend for symbols, abbreviations and notations used in the drawings.


2. Site Plan for any new exterior alterations (i.e., enlargement/addition of exterior windows, doors, skylights, fan/duct/vent terminations, etc.). On Site Plan please specify lot dimensions and clearly indicate the distances from the building to property lines.


3. Existing Floor Plan for a floor/story where the kitchen is located. Specify the existing use of all rooms and areas. Show location of existing kitchen. (Note: existing floor plan does not have to be to scale and is required for reference purposes only).


4. Proposed Kitchen Floor Plan showing type and location of proposed interior cabinetry, countertops, appliances, plumbing & gas fixtures, etc. Include construction legend identifying and describing new work and clearly showing the difference between the existing and proposed conditions. Exterior windows/doors added and/or replaced as part of the remodeling project shall be clearly identified on the plans and shall have a fenestration U-Factor of 0.67 or less.


5. Construction details for any new/reframed interior walls, interior/exterior openings, etc.


6. Electrical Plan (may be combined with the floor plan) showing compliance with the following requirements:


A. Specify receptacle outlets at each kitchen counter space wider than 12”, located so that no point along the counter wall is more than 24” from a receptacle per CEC Art.210-52;


B. Specify at least one receptacle outlet at each island or peninsular counter space with a long dimension of 24” or greater and a short dimension of 12” or greater per CEC Art.210-52(c);


C. Specify all electrical outlets serving kitchen countertops shall GFCI protected (CEC Arc.210-12(b));


D. Specify at least two separate 20-amp circuits for small kitchen appliances. Note: kitchen appliance circuits are limited to supplying wall and counter space outlets only. (CEC Art.210-52).



KITCHEN and BATHROOM CIRCUITS REQUIREMENTS

MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS FOR KITCHENS:CIRCUITS - (No lighting or other outlets may be on any circuits listed below.)2 or more 20 amp small appliance branch circuits. Serve kitchen, pantry, breakfast room, dining room and clock,electric ignition systems (gas cook top).

1 - 15 amp or 20 amp for built in microwave fix in

1 - 15 amp for each garbage disposal

1 - 15 amp for each dishwasher

1 - 15 amp for each compactor

1 - 15 amp or greater permitted for refrigeration equipment

RECEPTACLE SPACING FOR KITCHEN COUNTER NEC Code requires a receptacle outlet at each counter space wider than 12 inches, spaced so that no point along the wall line is more than 24" from a receptacle. Receptacles to serve island or peninsula counter tops shall be installed above, or within 12" below counter top. Receptacle outlets shall be installed so that no point along the center line of the long dimension is more than 24" measured horizontally from a receptacle in that space. The measurement of peninsula type counter top is from the edge connecting to the non-peninsula counter.

Counter top spaces separated by range tops, refrigerators, or sinks shall be considered as separate counter top spaces. Receptacles rendered inaccessible by appliances fastened in place shall not be considered as these required outlets. Receptacles shall not be installed in a face-up position in the work surfaces or counter tops in a kitchen of dining area.

All 15 and 20 ampere receptacles that serve counter top surfaces shall have G.F.I.C. protection. Receptacle outlets that serve counter top surfaces require GFCI protection for personnel

52(c);


C. Specify all electrical outlets serving kitchen countertops shall GFCI protected (CEC Arc.210-12(b));


D. Specify at least two separate 20-amp circuits for small kitchen appliances. Note: kitchen appliance circuits are limited to supplying wall and counter space outlets only. (CEC Art.210-52).


                     


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